5/22: NATIVE and WeWork’s Creative Release Party

At NATIVE, we believe in the catharsis that comes with creativity. We think there’s nothing like that feeling you get when your hard work—the stuff that’s the result of sleepless nights in front of the laptop, sewing machine, or studio monitors—is finally ready to be released into the world. It might just be the coolest (and most anxiety-inducing) feeling there is.

To celebrate that feeling, NATIVE and WeWork present Creative Release, an event where the creative endeavors featured in the pages of NATIVE come to life. Every month at WeWork 901 Woodland, NATIVEs will get a chance to experience some of the finest creative projects in Nashville firsthand. But more importantly, you’ll get a get to meet the people who painstakingly built those projects with nothing but their blood, sweat, and (definitely not pirated) Ableton accounts.
This month, Creative Release is happening May 22 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m, and will feature performances from past NATIVE feature Phangs, plus a few surprise DJ sets (like maybe one from June You Oughta Know feature Tayls). There’s also going to be art from Emily Sue Laird, Beth Inglish, and Jesse Keogh; a photo booth featuring playwrights from the Ingram New Works Festival; a live video premiere from Voodoo Children (that’s JT Daly from Paper Route’s side project); lingerie from Darlin‘; shoe shines, leather repair, and a charity shoe drop-off (benefiting Soles4Souls) from Peabody Shoe Repair; a wildflower identification station with NATIVE contributor Sarah B. Gilliam; and a hemp station courtesy of Yuyo Botanics. Oh, and there’s also going to be free  beer from MadTree Brewing and food (even local innovators have to eat).
While you’re there, check out Issue 71 of NATIVE and take a look around WeWork—we promise you won’t be disappointed. Free entry when you RSVP here.

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